The servant class city: urban revitalization versus the working poor in San Diego

Karjanen, David J. The servant class city: urban revitalization versus the working poor in San Diego. Minnesota, 2016. 292p ISBN 9780816694624, $98.00; ISBN 9780816697489 pbk, $28.00; ISBN 9781452953366 ebook.

Karjanen (American studies, Minnesota) examines the servant class (hospitality industry, retail, informal work). Good jobs (regular and sufficient hours with benefits and ladders for advancement) are very scarce. With a limited social safety net, people rely on “do-it-yourself” safety nets of family and friends. Asset poverty makes the risks associated with unexpected costs or expenditures on education and training too high for the reward. Karjanen argues that conventional policy prescriptions fail in the complex situations these workers face. Job quality is more important than the number of jobs. The working poor need financial institutions designed to help them build assets. Karjanen is skeptical that current policies work. Urban policy should be more like public health practice and preventive medicine. This valuable case study does an excellent job of demonstrating the complex reality the hardworking poor face in neoliberal capitalism. Largely a descriptive study, the book is slow reading except for the vignettes in later chapters and the author’s discussion of what is wrong with current policy. For collections in the sociology of work, urban studies, and inequality.
Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above.

From Choice Connect

Harlem supers: the social life of a community in transition

Williams, Terry. Harlem supers: the social life of a community in transition. Palgrave Macmillan, 2015 (c2016). 243p  ISBN 9781349562411 pbk, $34.99

Terry Williams, author of The Cocaine Kids, Crackhouse, and The Conmen, continues his work on urban life in this book on Harlem “supers”, (managers responsible for repair and maintenance in a residential building). The text is full of field notes from nine supers selected for different locations and personal characteristics. It is part memoir, Williams has been a super and an investor in buildings that employ supers. His story and the stories of the supers he interviews are intertwined. The book is very digressive and the narrative thread is easily lost. He asserts that supers are crucial actors in their communities, but he does not give the reader a clear idea about how this works. It compares to Doormen by Peter Bearman, but does not develop sociological theory as well. Williams mentions many sociological concepts, but does not adequately link these ideas to the supers. Advanced students can make the links, but younger students will not. There are few photos, no captions, and no map for reference to building and neighborhood locations. The book is suitable for advanced urban courses but not for work or occupations.
Upper-division Undergraduates, Graduate Students, Researchers/Faculty, Professionals/Practitioners

From Choice Connect

Racism and Response in Brighton, 1960

In 1960 an African American family was prevented from buying a house at 42 Varinna Drive in Brighton. This is a newspaper report about the law suit they filed in response.

Found on Newspapers.com

The Women’s Human Relations Council (WHRC), which had done a “drive aimed at determining what parts of Greater Rochester would be agreeable to receiving Negro families as neighbors.” the WHRC reported that they had 60 pledges in their files from residents of the neighborhood bounded by Winton Road, Monroe Avenue, and Highland Avenue. These pledged indicated that they would ‘welcome any family of good character regardless of race, creed, or color.’ The newspaper estimates about 350 homes in the neighborhood.

Found on Newspapers.com

City-County Committee on Human Relations is urged to consider the case.

Found on Newspapers.com

Letter to the Editor from Dr.G.L. Glaser

Found on Newspapers.com

The residents of Castlebar Road write letter to the editor in support of the Tollivers.

Found on Newspapers.com

Agreement reached with the defendants in the suit to give the Tollivers an option to buy the house on the original terms.

Found on Newspapers.com

The Tollivers acquire the option to buy.

Found on Newspapers.com

The two men trying to prevent the Tollivers from buying give them the option, but they still maintain Tolliver’s legal action was “wholly without merit.”

Found on Newspapers.com

Rabbi Herbert Bronstein cites the Tolliver case as a successful resistance to discrimination.

Found on Newspapers.com

Over the next few months a number of items indicate that the Tollivers were participating in panels and presentations at churches and civic organizations discussing discrimination in housing.

Peter M. Tolliver is co-chair for Congress of Racial Equality dance/fundraiser in support of “Freedom Riders”

Found on Newspapers.com

Peter Tolliver on a panel at NAACP meeting on housing.

Found on Newspapers.com

CORE leads rent strike in April 1964
Found on Newspapers.com

In 1981 and 1983 Peter M. Tolliver was the Democratic Party candidate for Brighton Town Supervisor

Peter M. Tolliver inventor 1993.

Found on Newspapers.com

Page 2E
Found on Newspapers.com

Patents by Peter M. Tolliver

 

RCSD Salaries 2015

See Through NY Payrolls for Schools published the payroll of school employees for NY State in 2015

Rochester City School District

RCSDTotalPayThe shaded area represents General Employees and the unshaded area represents Educators.

Educator General Employee
Average $61,548 $39,561
25th percentile $50,561 $21,517
Median $62,317 $32,917
75th percentile $74,343 $52,860

Top 50 on payroll

Name Total Pay Subagency/Type
Ellison, Larry A $206,812 NYSTRS – Educator
Vargas, Bolgen T $201,000 NYSTRS – Educator
Atkins, Bonnie M $191,445 NYSTRS – Educator
Ramos, Vicma I $174,283 NYSTRS – Educator
Rainey, Denise D $167,967 NYSTRS – Educator
Ingutti, Judith J $166,738 NYSTRS – Educator
Pacheco, Brenda L $165,310 NYSTRS – Educator
Bovard, Adele A $162,215 NYSTRS – Educator
Bates, Marguerite F $160,273 NYSTRS – Educator
Mora, Jose A $157,642 NYSTRS – Educator
Malgieri, Patricia K $155,000 NYSLRS – General Employee
Ansbrow, William J $155,000 NYSLRS – General Employee
Blocker, Marlene M $154,990 NYSTRS – Educator
Liguori-Alampi, Michele S $153,242 NYSTRS – Educator
Cliby, Timothy L $152,105 NYSTRS – Educator
Jackson, Sharon E $151,212 NYSTRS – Educator
Laniak, Matthew K $150,416 NYSTRS – Educator
Otuwa, Christiana $149,769 NYSTRS – Educator
Johnson, Donnarae $149,679 NYSTRS – Educator
Green, Shirley J $148,946 NYSTRS – Educator
Soler, Anibal, Jr $148,542 NYSTRS – Educator
Moore, Wakili $148,346 NYSTRS – Educator
Hargis, Kathryn E $148,070 NYSTRS – Educator
Gattelaro-Andersen, Donna M $148,033 NYSTRS – Educator
Smith, Richard L, Jr $147,439 NYSTRS – Educator
Matthew, Deasure A $147,391 NYSTRS – Educator
Henry-Wheeler, Anissa M $147,345 NYSLRS – General Employee
Jackson, Karon A $147,134 NYSTRS – Educator
Waters, Theodora C $146,096 NYSTRS – Educator
Dangler, Patricia A $145,513 NYSTRS – Educator
Brockler, Patricia L $145,473 NYSTRS – Educator
Aronson, Mary J $145,422 NYSTRS – Educator
Lopez-Soto, Edwin J $145,000 NYSLRS – General Employee
Giamartino, Raymond J $145,000 NYSTRS – Educator
Keysa, Thomas P $143,736 NYSLRS – General Employee
Owens, Idonia M $143,191 NYSTRS – Educator
Avery-Detoy, Laurel A $142,793 NYSTRS – Educator
Pringle, Beverley E $142,504 NYSTRS – Educator
Pantoja, Thani A $142,224 NYSTRS – Educator
Arthur, Joan M $142,210 NYSTRS – Educator
Bell, Clinton A $142,076 NYSTRS – Educator
Lazio, Deborah $141,705 NYSTRS – Educator
Rutland, Pamela D $141,511 NYSTRS – Educator
Wideman, Joanne $141,344 NYSTRS – Educator
Andrecolich-Diaz, Mary P $140,486 NYSTRS – Educator
Ramirez, Armando $139,577 NYSTRS – Educator
Johnson, Camaron K $136,652 NYSTRS – Educator
Bemish, Stephanie S $135,717 NYSTRS – Educator
Hamilton-Rose, Lessie $135,661 NYSTRS – Educator
Grant, David M $135,275 NYSTRS – Educator